MyDNS Backend

  • Native: Yes
  • Master: No
  • Slave: No
  • Superslave: No
  • Autoserial: No
  • Case: Depends
  • DNSSEC: No
  • Disabled data: No
  • Comments: No
  • Module name: mydns
  • Launch name: mydns

The MyDNS backend makes PowerDNS a drop-in replacement for the MyDNS nameserver, as it uses the same database schema.

Configuration Parameters

mydns-host

Database host to connect to.

mydns-port

Port on the database server to connect to.

mydns-dbname

Name of the database to connect to, “mydns” by default.

mydns-user

User for the database, “powerdns” by default.

mydns-password

The user password.

mydns-socket

Unix socket to connect to the database.

mydns-rr-table

Name of the resource record table in the database, “rr” by default.

mydns-soa-table

Name of the SOA table in the database, “soa” by default.

mydns-soa-where

Additional WHERE clause for SOA, default is “1 = 1”.

mydns-rr-where

Additional WHERE clause for resource records, default is “1 = 1”.

mydns-soa-active

Use the active column in the SOA table, “yes” by default.

mydns-rr-active

Use the active column in the resource record table, “yes” by default.

mydns-use-minimal-ttl

Setting this to ‘yes’ will make the backend behave like MyDNS on the TTL values. Setting it to ‘no’ will make it ignore the minimal-ttl of the zone. The default is “yes”.

Migrating from MyDNS to another SQL backend

To use one of the generic SQL backend, like the Postgresql or MySQL backends, the data can be migratedusing the Backend to Backend migration guide.