Note: Beyond PowerDNS 2.9.20, the Authoritative Server and Recursor are released separately.

PowerDNS Recursor 3.6.2

Note: Version 3.6.2 is a bugfix update to 3.6.1. Released on the 30th of October 2014.

Official download page

A list of changes since 3.6.1 follows.

PowerDNS Authoritative Server 3.4.1

Warning: Version 3.4.1 of the PowerDNS Authoritative Server is a major upgrade if you are coming from 2.9.x. Additionally, if you are coming from any 3.x version (including 3.3.1), there is a mandatory SQL schema upgrade. Please refer to the Upgrade documentation for important information on correct and stable operation, as well as notes on performance and memory use.

Released October 30th, 2014

Find the downloads on our download page.

This is a bugfix update to 3.4.0 and any earlier version.

A list of changes since 3.4.0 follows.

PowerDNS Authoritative Server 3.4.0

Released September 30th, 2014

This is a performance, feature, bugfix and conformity update to 3.3.1 and any earlier version. It contains a huge amount of work by various contributors, to whom we are very grateful.

Warning: Version 3.4.0 of the PowerDNS Authoritative Server is a major upgrade if you are coming from 2.9.x. Additionally, if you are coming from any 3.x version (including 3.3.1), there is a mandatory SQL schema upgrade. Please refer to the Upgrade documentation for important information on correct and stable operation, as well as notes on performance and memory use.

Downloads

Find the downloads on our download page.

A list of changes since 3.3.1 follows.

Changes between RC2 and 3.4.0:

Changes between RC1 and RC2:

Changes between 3.3.1 and 3.4.0-RC1 follow.

DNSSEC changes

New features

Bugfixes

REST API changes

Other changes

PowerDNS Recursor 3.6.1

Warning: Version 3.6.1 is a mandatory security upgrade to 3.6.0! Released on the 10th of September 2014.

PowerDNS Recursor 3.6.0 could crash with a specific sequence of packets. For more details, see the advisory. PowerDNS Recursor 3.6.1 was very well tested, and is in full production already, so it should be a safe upgrade.

Downloads

In addition to various fixes related to this potential crash, 3.6.1 fixes a few minor issues and adds a debugging feature:

PowerDNS Recursor version 3.6.0

This is a performance, feature and bugfix update to 3.5/3.5.3. It contains important fixes for slightly broken domain names, which your users expect to work anyhow. It also brings robust resilience against certain classes of attacks.

Downloads

Changes between RC1 and release

New features

Improvements

Fixes

PowerDNS Authoritative Server version 3.3.1

Released December 17th, 2013

This is a bugfix update to 3.3.

Downloads

Changes since 3.3

PowerDNS Recursor version 3.5.3

Released September 17th, 2013

This is a bugfix and performance update to 3.5.2. It brings serious performance improvements for dual stack users.

Downloads

Changes since 3.5.2

PowerDNS Recursor version 3.5.2

Released June 7th, 2013

This is a stability and bugfix update to 3.5.1. It contains important fixes that improve operation for certain domains.

Downloads

Changes since 3.5.1

PowerDNS Authoritative Server version 3.3

Released on July 5th 2013

This a stability, bugfix and conformity update to 3.2. It improves interoperability with various validators, either through bugfixes or by catering to their needs beyond the specifications.

Warning: Version 3.3 of the PowerDNS Authoritative Server is a major upgrade if you are coming from 2.9.x. There are also some important changes if you are coming from 3.0, 3.1 or 3.2. Please refer to the Upgrade documentation for important information on correct and stable operation, as well as notes on performance and memory use.

Downloads

Changes between RC2 and final

Changes between RC1 and RC2

New features and important changes since 3.2 (these changes are in RC1 and up)

Important bug fixes

Other changes

PowerDNS Recursor version 3.5.1

Released May 3rd, 2013

This is a stability and bugfix update to 3.5. It contains important fixes that improve operation for certain domains.

Downloads

Changes since 3.5

PowerDNS Recursor version 3.5

Released April 15th, 2013

This is a stability, security and bugfix update to 3.3/3.3.1. It contains important fixes for slightly broken domain names, which your users expect to work anyhow. Note: Because a semi-sanctioned 3.4-pre was distributed for a long time, and people have come to call that 3.4, we are skipping an actual 3.4 release to avoid confusion.

Downloads

Changes between RC5 and the final 3.5 release

Changes between RC4 and RC5

Changes between RC3 (unreleased) and RC4

Changes between RC1 and RC2

New features

Improvements

Bugs fixed

PowerDNS Authoritative Server 3.2

Released January 17th, 2013

This is a stability and conformity update to 3.1. It mostly makes our DNSSEC implementation more robust, and improves interoperability with various validators. 3.2 has received very extensive testing on a lot of edge cases, verifying output both against common validators and compared against other authoritative servers.

Warning: Version 3.2 of the PowerDNS Authoritative Server is a major upgrade if you are coming from 2.9.x. There are also some important changes if you are coming from 3.0 or 3.1. Please refer to the Upgrade documentation for important information on correct and stable operation, as well as notes on performance and memory use.

Downloads

In addition to all the changes below, we now auto-build semi-static packages. Relevant changes to make that possible are in commit 2849, commit 2853, 2858, commit 2859, commit 2860.

Changes between 3.2-RC4 and the final 3.2 release

Changes between 3.2-RC3 and 3.2-RC4

Changes between 3.2-RC2 and 3.2-RC3

Changes between 3.2-RC1 and 3.2-RC2

Changes below are in 3.2-RC1 and up.

DNSSEC changes in 3.2

Non-DNSSEC improvements/changes

Assorted bugfixes

PowerDNS Authoritative Server 3.1

Released on the 4th of May 2012 RC3 released on the 30th of April 2012 RC2 released on the 14th of April 2012 RC1 released on the 23th of March 2012

Warning: Version 3.1 of the PowerDNS Authoritative Server is a major upgrade if you are coming from 2.9.x. There are also some important changes if you are coming from 3.0. Please refer to the Upgrade documentation for important information on correct and stable operation, as well as notes on performance and memory use.

Version 3.1 of the PowerDNS Authoritative Server represents the 'coming of age' of our DNSSEC implementation. In addition, 3.1 solves a lot of '.0' issues typically associated with a major new release.

As usual, we are very grateful for the involvement of the PowerDNS community. The uptake of 3.0 was rapid, and many users were very helpful in shaking out the bugs, and willing to test the fixes we provided or, in many cases, provided the fixes themselves.

Of specific note is the giant PowerDNS DNSSEC deployment in Sweden by Atomia and Binero. PowerDNS 3.0 now powers over 150000 DNSSEC domains in Sweden, around 95% of all DNSSEC domains, in a country were most internet service providers actually validate all .SE domains.

Finally, this release has benefited a lot from Peter van Dijk joining us, as he has merged a tremendous amount of patches, cleaned up years of accumulated dust in the code, and massively improved our regression testing into a full blown continuous integration setup with full DNSSEC tests!

Additionally, we would like to thank Ruben d'Arco, Jose Arthur Benetasso Villanova, Marc Haber, Jimmy Bergman, Aki Tuomi and everyone else who helped us out!

Downloads

Changes between RC3 and final

Changes between RC2 and RC3

Changes between RC1 and RC2

Bug fixes

New features

Improvements

Other changes

Authoritative Server version 2.9.22.6

The improvements to the master/slave engine in 2.9.22.5 contained one serious bug that can cause crashes on busy setups. 2.9.22.6 fixes this crash.

Authoritative Server version 2.9.22.5

2.9.22.5 is an interim release for those not yet ready to make the jump to 3.0, but do need a more recent version of the Authoritative Server. It also contains the patch from PowerDNS Security Advisory 2012-01.

PowerDNS Authoritative Server 3.0.1

Warning: The DNSSEC implementation of PowerDNS Authoritative Server 3.0 and 3.0.1 contains many issues regarding CNAMES, wildcards and (in)secure delegations. If you use any of these, and you use DNSSEC you MUST upgrade to 3.1 or beyond!

3.0.1 consists of 3.0, plus the patch from PowerDNS Security Advisory 2012-01

PowerDNS Authoritative Server 3.0

Released on the 22nd of July 2011 RC1 released on the 4th of April 2011 RC2 released on the 19th of April 2011 RC3 released on the 19th of July 2011

Warning: Version 3.0 of the PowerDNS Authoritative Server is a major upgrade if you are coming from 2.9.x. Please refer to the Upgrade documentation for important information on correct and stable operation, as well as notes on performance and memory use.

Warning: The DNSSEC implementation of PowerDNS Authoritative Server 3.0 and 3.0.1 contains many issues regarding CNAMES, wildcards and (in)secure delegations. If you use any of these, and you use DNSSEC you MUST upgrade to 3.1 or beyond!

Version 3.0 of the PowerDNS Authoritative Server brings a number of important features, as well as over two years of accumulated bug fixing.

The largest news in 3.0 is of course the advent of DNSSEC. Not only does PowerDNS now (finally) support DNSSEC, we think that our support of this important protocol is among the easiest to use available. In addition, all important algorithms are supported.

Complete detail can be found in Serving authoritative DNSSEC data. The goal of 'PowerDNSSEC' is to allow existing PowerDNS installations to start serving DNSSEC with as little hassle as possible, while maintaining performance and achieving high levels of security.

Tutorials and examples of how to use DNSSEC in PowerDNS can be found linked from http://powerdnssec.org.

PowerDNS Authoritative Server 3.0 development has been made possible by the financial and moral support of

This release has received exceptional levels of community support, and we'd like to thank the following people in addition to those mentioned explicitly below: Peter Koch (DENIC), Olaf Kolkman (NLNetLabs), Wouter Wijngaards (NLNetLabs), Marco Davids (SIDN), Markus Travaille (SIDN), Leen Besselink, Antoin Verschuren (SIDN), Olafur Guðmundsson (IETF), Dan Kaminsky (Recursion Ventures), Roy Arends (Nominet), Miek Gieben (SIDN), Stephane Bortzmeyer (AFNIC), Michael Braunoeder (nic.at), Peter van Dijk, Maik Zumstrull, Jose Arthur Benetasso Villanova (Locaweb), Stefan Schmidt, Roland van Rijswijk (Surfnet), Paul Bakker (Brainspark/Fox-IT), Mathew Hennessy, Johannes Kuehrer (Austrian World4You GmbH), Marc van de Geijn (bHosted.nl), Stefan Arentz and Martin van Hensbergen (Fox-IT), Christof Meerwald, Detlef Peeters, Jack Lloyd, Frank Altpeter, Fredrik Danerklint, Vasiliy G Tolstov, Brielle Bruns, Evan Hunt, Ralf van der Enden, Marc Laros, Serge Belyshev, Christian Hofstaedtler, Charlie Smurthwaite, Nikolaos Milas, ..

Known issues as of RC3

Changes between RC3 and final

Changes between RC2 and RC3

Other major new features

Bugs fixed

Improvements

Recursor version 3.3.1

Warning:Unreleased

Version 3.3.1 contains a small number of important fixes, adds some memory usage statistics, but no new features.

Recursor version 3.3

Released on the 22nd of September 2010.

Warning: Version 3.3 fixes a number of small but persistent issues, rounds off our IPv6 %link-level support and adds an important feature for many users of the Lua scripts.

In addition, scalability on Solaris 10 is improved.

Bug fixes

Improvements

Changes between RC1, RC2 and RC3.

Recursor version 3.2

Released on the 7th of March 2010.

Warning: Lua scripts from version 3.1.7.* are fully compatible with version 3.2. However, scripts written for development snapshot releases, are NOT. Please see Scripting for details!

The 3.2 release is the first major release of the PowerDNS Recursor in a long time. Partly this is because 3.1.7.* functioned very well, and delivered satisfying performance, partly this is because in order to really move forward, some heavy lifting had to be done.

As always, we are grateful for the large PowerDNS community that is actively involved in improving the quality of our software, be it by submitting patches, by testing development versions of our software or helping debug interesting issues. We specifically want to thank Stefan Schmidt and Florian Weimer, who both over the years have helped tremendously in keeping PowerDNS fast, stable and secure.

This version of the PowerDNS Recursor contains a rather novel form of lock-free multithreading, a situation that comes close to the old '--fork' trick, but allows the Recursor to fully utilize multiple CPUs, while delivering unified statistics and operational control.

In effect, this delivers the best of both worlds: near linear scaling, with almost no administrative overhead.

Compared to 'regular multithreading', whereby threads cooperate more closely, more memory is used, since each thread maintains its own DNS cache. However, given the economics, and the relatively limited total amount of memory needed for high performance, this price is well worth it.

In practical numbers, over 40,000 queries/second sustained performance has now been measured by a third party, with a 100.0% packet response rate. This means that the needs of around 400,000 residential connections can now be met by a single commodity server.

In addition to the above, the PowerDNS Recursor is now providing resolver service for many more Internet users than ever before. This has brought with it 24/7 Service Level Agreements, and 24/7 operational monitoring by networking personnel at some of the largest telecommunications companies in the world.

In order to facilitate such operation, more statistics are now provided that allow the visual verification of proper PowerDNS Recursor operation. As an example of this there are now graphs that plot how many queries were dropped by the operating system because of a CPU overload, plus statistics that can be monitored to determine if the PowerDNS deployment is under a spoofing attack. All in all, this is a large and important PowerDNS Release, paving the way for further innovation.

Note: This release removes support for the 'fork' multi-processor option. In addition, the default is now to spawn two threads. This has been done in such a way that total memory usage will remain identical, so each thread will use half of the allocated maximum number of cache entries.

Changes between RC2 and -release

Changes between RC1 and RC2

New features

Compiler/Operating system/Library updates

Bug fixes

Recursor version 3.1.7.2

Released on the 6th of January 2010.

This release consist of a number of vital security updates. These updates address issues that can in all likelihood lead to a full system compromise. In addition, it is possible for third parties to pollute your cache with dangerous data, exposing your users to possible harm.

This version has been well tested, and at the time of this release is already powering millions of internet connections, and should therefore be a risk-free upgrade from 3.1.7.1 or any earlier version of the PowerDNS Recursor.

All known versions of the PowerDNS Recursor are impacted to a greater or lesser extent, so an immediate update is advised.

These vulnerabilities were discovered by a third party that can't yet be named, but who we thank for their contribution to a more secure PowerDNS Recursor.

For more information, see PowerDNS Security Advisory 2010-01 and PowerDNS Security Advisory 2010-02.

Recursor version 3.1.7.1

Released on the 2nd of August 2009.

This release consists entirely of fixes for tiny bugs that have been reported over the past year. In addition, compatibility has been restored with the latest versions of the gcc compiler and the 'boost' libraries.

No features have been added, but some debugging code that very slightly impacted performance (and polluted the console when operating in the foreground) has been removed.

FreeBSD users may want to upgrade because of a very remote chance of 3.1.7 and previous crashing once every few years. For other operators not currently experiencing problems, there is no reason to upgrade.

Authoritative Server version 2.9.22

Released on the 27th of January 2009.

This is a huge release, spanning almost 20 months of development. Besides fixing a lot of bugs, of note is the addition of the so called 'Notification Proxy', which allows PowerDNS to function as a master server behind a firewall, plus the huge performance improvement of the internal caches.

This work has been made possible by UPC Broadband and Directi, respectively.

Finally, the release candidates of this version have been tested & improved by Jorn Ekkelenkamp, Ton van Rosmalen, Jeff Sipek, Tyler Hall, Christof Meerwald and Stefan Schmidt.

Fixed between rc1 and rc2, but not an issue in 2.9.21.

New features

Performance

Bugs fixed

Improvements

Authoritative Server version 2.9.21.2

Released on the 18th of November 2008.

This release consists of a single patch to PowerDNS Authoritative Server version 2.9.21.1. In some configurations, notably with configuration option 'distributor-threads=1', the PowerDNS Authoritative Server crashes easily in some error conditions.

All users are urged to upgrade. Even though PowerDNS restarts itself on encountering such error conditions, and even though most PowerDNS configurations do not run in single threaded mode, an upgrade is recommended.

More detail can be found in PowerDNS Security Advisory 2008-02.

Authoritative Server version 2.9.21.1

Released on the 6th of August 2008.

This release consists of a single patch to PowerDNS Authoritative Server version 2.9.21. Brian J. Dowling of Simplicity Communications has discovered a security implication of the previous PowerDNS behaviour to drop queries it considers malformed. We are grateful that Brian notified us quickly about this problem.

This issue has been assigned CVE-2008-3337. The single patch is in commit 1239. More detail can be found in PowerDNS Security Advisory 2008-02.

The implication is that while the PowerDNS Authoritative server itself does not face a security risk because of dropping these malformed queries, other resolving nameservers run a higher risk of accepting spoofed answers for domains being hosted by PowerDNS Authoritative Servers before 2.9.21.1.

While the dropping of queries does not aid sophisticated spoofing attempts, it does facilitate simpler attacks.

It may be good to know that several large sites already run with this patch applied, as it has been in the public code base for some weeks already.

Recursor version 3.1.7

Released the 25th of June 2008.

This version contains powerful scripting abilities, allowing operators to modify DNS responses in many interesting ways. Among other things, these abilities can be used to filter out malware domains, to perform load balancing, to comply with legal and other requirements and finally, to implement 'NXDOMAIN' redirection.

It is hoped that the addition of Lua scripting will enable responsible DNS modification for those that need it.

For more details about the Lua scripting, which can be modified, loaded and unloaded at runtime, see Scripting. Many thanks are due to the #lua irc channel, for excellent near-realtime Lua support. In addition, a number of PowerDNS users have been enthousiastically testing prereleases of the scripting support, and have found and solved many issues.

In addition, 3.1.7 fixes a number of bugs

Recursor version 3.1.6

Released on the 1st of May 2008.

This version fixes two important problems, each on its own important enough to justify a quick upgrade.

Recursor version 3.1.5

Released on the 31st of March 2008.

Much like 3.1.4, this release does not add a lot of major features. Instead, performance has been improved significantly (estimated at around 20%), and many rare and not so rare issues were addressed. Multi-part TXT records now work as expected - the only significant functional bug found in 15 months. One of the oldest feature requests was fulfilled: version 3.1.5 can finally forward queries for designated domains to multiple servers, on differing port numbers if needed. Previously only one forwarder address was supported. This lack held back a number of migrations to PowerDNS.

We would like to thank Amit Klein of Trusteer for bringing a serious vulnerability to our attention which would enable a smart attacker to 'spoof' previous versions of the PowerDNS Recursor into accepting possibly malicious data.

Details can be found on this Trusteer page.

It is recommended that all users of the PowerDNS Recursor upgrade to 3.1.5 as soon as practicable, while we simultaneously note that busy servers are less susceptible to the attack, but not immune.

The PowerDNS Security Advisory can be found in PowerDNS Security Advisory 2008-01.

This version can properly benefit from all IPv4 and IPv6 addresses in use at the root-servers as of early February 2008. In order to implement this, changes were made to how the Recursor deals internally with A and AAAA queries for nameservers, see below for more details.

Additionally, newer releases of the G++ compiler required some fixes (see ticket 173).

This release was made possible by the help of Wichert Akkerman, Winfried Angele, Arnoud Bakker (Fox-IT), Niels Bakker (no relation!), Leo Baltus (Nederlandse Publieke Omroep), Marco Davids (SIDN), David Gavarret (Neuf Cegetel), Peter Gervai, Marcus Goller (UPC), Matti Hiljanen (Saunalahti/Elisa), Ruben Kerkhof, Alex Kiernan, Amit Klein (Trusteer), Kenneth Marshall (Rice University), Thomas Rietz, Marcus Rueckert (OpenSUSE), Augie Schwer (Sonix), Sten Spans (Bit), Stefan Schmidt (Freenet), Kai Storbeck (xs4all), Alex Trull, Andrew Turnbull (No Wires) and Aaron Thompson, and many more who filed bugs anonymously, or who we forgot to mention.

Performance

Bug fixes

New features

General improvements

PowerDNS Authoritative Server version 2.9.21

Released the 21st of April 2007.

This is the first release the PowerDNS Authoritative Server since the Recursor was split off to a separate product, and also marks the transfer of the new technology developed specifically for the recursor, back to the authoritative server.

This move has reduced the amount of code of the Authoritative server by over 2000 lines, while improving the quality of the program enormously.

However, since so much has been changed, care should be taken when deploying 2.9.21.

To signify the magnitude of the underlying improvements, the next release of the PowerDNS Authoritative Server will be called 3.0.

This release would not have been possible without large amounts of help and support from the PowerDNS Community. We specifically want to thank Massimo Bandinelli of Italy's Register.it, Dave Aaldering of Aaldering ICT, True BV, XS4ALL, Daniel Bilik of Neosystem, EasyDNS, Heinrich Ruthensteiner of Siemens, Augie Schwer, Mark Bergsma, Marco Davids, Marcus Rueckert of OpenSUSE, Andre Muraro of Locaweb, Antony Lesuisse, Norbert Sendetzky, Marco Chiavacci, Christoph Haas, Ralf van der Enden and Ruben Kerkhof.

Security issues

Warning: The 'bind1' legacy version of our BIND backend has been dropped! There should be no need to rely on this old version anymore, as the main BIND backend has been very well tested recently.

Bugs

Features

Improvements

Recursor version 3.1.4

Released the 13th of November 2006.

This release contains almost no new features, but consists mostly of minor and major bug fixes. It also addresses two major security issues, which makes this release a highly recommended upgrade.

Security issues

Bugs

Improvements

Recursor version 3.1.3

Released the 12th of September 2006.

Compared to 3.1.2, this release again consists of a number of mostly minor bug fixes, and some slight improvements.

Many thanks are again due to Darren Gamble who together with his team has discovered many misconfigured domains that do work with some other name servers. DNS has long been tolerant of misconfigurations, PowerDNS intends to uphold that tradition. Almost all of the domains found by Darren now work as well in PowerDNS as in other name server implementations.

Thanks to some recent migrations, this release, or something very close to it, is powering over 40 million internet connections that we know of. We appreciate hearing about successful as well as unsuccessful migrations, please feel free to notify pdns.bd@powerdns.com of your experiences, good or bad.

Bug-fixes

Improvements

Recursor version 3.1.2

Released Monday 26th of June 2006.

Compared to 3.1.1, this release consists almost exclusively of bug-fixes and speedups. A quick update is recommended, as some of the bugs impact operators of authoritative zones on the internet. This version has been tested by some of the largest internet providers on the planet, and is expected to perform well for everybody.

Many thanks are due to Darren Gamble, Stefan Schmidt and Bryan Seitz who all provided excellent feedback based on their large-scale tests of the recursor.

Bug-fixes

Improvements

Recursor version 3.1.1

Released on the 23rd of May 2006.

Warning: 3.1.1 is identical to 3.1 except for a bug in the packet chaining code which would mainly manifest itself for IPv6 enabled Konqueror users with very fast connections to their PowerDNS installation. However, all 3.1 users are urged to upgrade to 3.1.1. Many thanks to Alessandro Bono for his quick aid in solving this problem.

Many thanks are due to the operators of some of the largest internet access providers in the world, each having many millions of customers, who have tested the various 3.1 pre-releases for suitability. They have uncovered and helped fix bugs that could impact us all, but are only (quickly) noticeable with such vast amounts of DNS traffic.

After version 3.0.1 has proved to hold up very well under tremendous loads, 3.1 adds important new features

Bug fixes

Improvements

Recursor version 3.0.1

Released 25th of April 2006, download.

This release consists of nothing but tiny fixes to 3.0, including one with security implications. An upgrade is highly recommended.

Operating system specific fixes

Recursor version 3.0

Released 20th of April 2006, download.

This is the first separate release of the PowerDNS Recursor. There are many reasons for this, one of the most important ones is that previously we could only do a release when both the recursor and the authoritative nameserver were fully tested and in good shape. The split allows us to release new versions when each part is ready.

Now for the real news. This version of the PowerDNS recursor powers the network access of over two million internet connections. Two large access providers have been running pre-releases of 3.0 for the past few weeks and results are good. Furthermore, the various pre-releases have been tested nearly non-stop with DNS traffic replayed at 3000 queries/second.

As expected, the 2 million households shook out some very rare bugs. But even a rare bug happens once in a while when there are this many users.

We consider this version of the PowerDNS recursor to be the most advanced resolver publicly available. Given current levels of spam, phishing and other forms of internet crime we think no recursor should offer less than the best in spoofing protection. We urge all operators of resolvers without proper spoofing countermeasures to consider PowerDNS, as it is a Better Internet Nameserver Daemon.

A good article on DNS spoofing can be found here. Some more information, based on a previous version of PowerDNS, can be found on the PowerDNS development blog.

Warning: Because of recent DNS based denial of service attacks, running an open recursor has become a security risk. Therefore, unless configured otherwise this version of PowerDNS will only listen on localhost, which means it does not resolve for hosts on your network. To fix, configure the local-address setting with all addresses you want to listen on. Additionally, by default service is restricted to RFC 1918 private IP addresses. Use allow-from to selectively open up the recursor for your own network. See pdns_recursor settings for details.

Important new features of the PowerDNS recursor 3.0

Many people helped package and test this release. Jorn Ekkelenkamp of ISP-Services helped find the '8000 SOAs' bug and spotted many other oddities and XS4ALL internet funded a lot of the recent development. Joaquín M López Muñoz of the boost::multi_index_container was again of great help.

Version 2.9.20

Released the 15th of March 2006

Besides adding OpenDBX, this release is mostly about fixing problems and speeding up the recursor. This release has been made possible by XS4ALL and True. Thanks!

Furthermore, we are very grateful for the help of Andrew Pinski, who hacks on gcc, and of Joaquín M López Muñoz, the author of boost::multi_index_container. Without their near-realtime help this release would've been delayed a lot. Thanks!

Bugs fixed in the recursor

Improvements to the recursor

Bugs fixed in the authoritative nameserver

Improvements to the authoritative nameserver

Miscellaneous

Version 2.9.19

Released 29th of October 2005.

As with other recent releases, the usage of PowerDNS appears to have skyrocketed. Informal, though strict, measurements show that PowerDNS now powers around 50% of all German domains, and somewhere in the order of 10-15% of the rest of the world. Furthermore, DNS is set to take a central role in connecting Voice over IP providers, with PowerDNS offering a very good feature set for these ENUM deployments. PowerDNS is already powering the E164.info ENUM zone and also acts as the backend for a major VoIP provisioning platform.

Included in this release is the now complete packet parsing/generating, record parsing/generating infrastructure. Furthermore, this framework is used by the recursor, hopefully making it very fast, memory efficient and robust. Many records are now processed using a single line of code. This has made the recursor a lot stricter in packet parsing, you will see some error messages which did not appear before. Rest assured however that these only happen for queries which have no valid answer in any case.

Furthermore, support for DNSSEC records is available in the new infrastructure, although is should be emphasised that there is more to DNSSEC than parsing records. There is no real support for DNSSEC (yet).

Additionally, the BIND Backend has been replaced by what was up to now known as the 'Bind2Backend'. Initial benchmarking appears to show that this backend is faster, uses less memory and has shorter startup times. The code is also shorter.

This release fixes a number of embarrassing bugs and is a recommended upgrade.

Thanks are due to XS4ALL who are supporting continuing development of PowerDNS, the fruits of which can be found in this release already. Furthermore, a remarkable number of people have helped report bugs, validate solutions or have submitted entire patches. Many thanks!

Improvements

Bugs fixed

Version 2.9.18

Released on the 16th of July 2005.

The '8 million domains' release, which also marks the battle readiness of the PowerDNS Recursor. The latest improvements have been made possible by financial support and contributions by Register.com and XS4ALL. Thanks!

This release brings a number of new features (vastly improved recursor, Generic Oracle Support, DNS analysis and replay tools, and more) but also has a new build dependency, the Boost library (version 1.31 or higher).

Currently several big ISPs are evaluating the PowerDNS recursor for their resolving needs, some of them have switched already. In the course of testing, over 350 million actual queries have been recorded and replayed, the answers turn out to be satisfactorily.

This testing has verified that the pdns recursor, as shipped in this release, can stand up to heavy duty ISP loads (over 20000 queries/second) and in fact does so better than major other nameservers, giving more complete answers and being faster to boot.

We invite ISPs who note recursor problems to record their problematic traffic and replay it using the tools described in Tools to analyse DNS traffic to discover if PowerDNS does a better job, and to let us know the results.

Additionally, the bind2backend is almost ready to replace the stock bind backend. If you run with Bind zones, you are cordially invited to substitute 'launch=bind2' for 'launch=bind'. This will happen automatically in 2.9.19!

In other news, the entire Wikipedia constellation now runs on PowerDNS using the Geo Backend! Thanks to Mark Bergsma for keeping us updated.

There are two bugs with security implications, which only apply to installations running with the LDAP backend, or installations providing recursion to a limited range of IP addresses. If any of these apply to you, an upgrade is highly advised

General bugs fixed

Compilation fixes

Improvements

Recursor improvements and fixes.

See Recursion for details. The changes below mean that all of the caveats listed for the recursor have now been addressed.

Backend fixes

New technology

Version 2.9.17

See the new timeline for progress reports.

The 'million domains' release - PowerDNS has now firmly established itself as a major player with the unofficial count (ie, guesswork) now at over two million PowerDNS domains! Also, the GeoBackend has been tested by a big website and may soon see wider deployment. Thanks to Mark Bergsma for spreading the word!

It is also a release with lots of changes and fixes. Take care when deploying!

Security issues

Enhancements

Bug fixes

Version 2.9.16

The 'it must still be Friday somewhere' release. Massive number of fixes, portability improvements and the new Geobackend by Mark Bergsma & friends.

New

Bugfixes

Improvements

Version 2.9.15

This release fixes up some of the shortcomings in 2.9.14, and adds some new features too.

Bugfixes

Improvements

Version 2.9.14

Big release with the fix for the all important 2\\^30 seconds problem and a lot of other news.

Improvements

Version 2.9.13

Big news! Windows is back! Our great friend Michel Stol found the time to update the PowerDNS code so it works again under windows.

Furthermore, big thanks go out to Dell who quickly repaired my trusty laptop.

His changes

Other news

Note: There appears to be a problem with PowerDNS on Red Hat 7.3 with GCC 2.96 and self-compiled binaries. The symptoms are that PowerDNS works on the foreground but fails as a daemon. We're working on it.

If you do note problems, let the list know, if you don't, please do so as well. Tell us if you use the RPM or compiled yourself.

It is known that not compiling in MySQL support helps solve the problem, but then you don't have MySQL.

There have been a number of reports on MySQL connections being dropped on FreeBSD 4.x, which sometimes causes PowerDNS to give up and reload itself. To combat this, MySQL error messages have been improved in some places in hopes of figuring out what is up. The initial indication is that MySQL itself sometimes terminates the connection and, amazingly, that switching to a Unix domain socket instead of TCP solves the problem.

Bug fixes

Improvements

Version 2.9.12

Release rich in features. Work on Verisign oddities, addition of SQLite backend, pdns_recursor maturity.

New features

Bugs

Improvements, cleanups

Version 2.9.11

Yet another iteration, hopefully this will be the last silly release.

Warning: There has been a change in behaviour whereby disable-axfr does what it means now! From now on, setting allow-axfr-ips automatically disables AXFR from unmentioned subnets.

This release enables AXFR again, disable-axfr did the opposite of what it claimed. Furthermore, the pdns_recursor now cleans its cache, which should save some memory in the long run. Norbert contributed some small LDAP work which should come in useful in the future.

Version 2.9.10

Small bugfixes, LDAP update. Released 3rd of July 2003. Apologies for the long delay, real life keeps interfering.

Warning: Do not use or try to use 2.9.9, it was a botched release!

Warning: There has been a change in behaviour whereby disable-axfr does what it means now! From now on, setting allow-axfr-ips automatically disables AXFR from unmentioned subnets.

Version 2.9.8

Queen's day release! 30th of April 2003.

Added support for AIX, fixed negative SOA caching. Some other cleanups. Not a major release but enough reasons to upgrade.

Bugs fixed

Improvements

Version 2.9.7

Released on 2003-03-20.

This is a sweeping release in the sense of cleanup. There are some new features but mostly a lot of cleanup going on. Hiding inside is the bind2backend, the next generation of the bind backend. A work in progress. Those of you with overlapping zones, as mentioned in the changelog of 2.9.6, are invited to check it out by replacing launch=bind by launch=bind2 and renaming all bind- parameters to bind2-. Be aware that if you run with many small zones, this backend is faster, but if you run with a few large ones, it is slower. This will improve.

Features

Improvements

Bugs fixed

Version 2.9.6

Two new backends - Generic ODBC (windows only) and LDAP. Furthermore, a few important bugs have been fixed which may have hampered sites seeing a lot of outgoing zone transfers. Additionally, the pdns recursor now has 'query throttling' which is pretty cool. In short this makes sure that PowerDNS does not send out heaps of queries if a nameserver is unable to provide an answer. Many operators of authoritative setups are all too aware of recursing nameservers that hammer them for zones they don't have, PowerDNS won't do that anymore now, no matter what clients request of it.

Warning: There is an unresolved issue with the BIND backend and 'overlapping' slave zones. So if you have 'example.com' and also have a separate slave zone called 'external.example.com', things may go wrong badly. Thanks to Christian Laursen for working with us a lot in finding this issue. We hope to resolve it soon.

Version 2.9.5

Released on 2002-02-03.

This version is almost entirely about recursion with major changes to both the pdns recursor, which is renamed to 'pdns_recursor' and to the main PowerDNS binary to make it interact better with the recursing component.

Sadly, due to technical reasons, compiling the pdns recursor and pdns authoritative nameserver into one binary is not immediately possible. During the release of 2.9.4 we stated that the recursing nameserver would be integrated in the next release - this won't happen now.

However, this turns out to not be that bad at all. The recursor can now be restarted without having to restart the rest of the nameserver, for example. Cooperation between the both halves of PDNS is also almost seamless. As a result, 'non-lazy recursion' has been dropped. See Recursion for more details.

Furthermore, the recursor only works on Linux, Windows and Solaris (not entirely). FreeBSD does not support the required functions. If you know any important FreeBSD people, plea with them to support set/get/swapcontext! Alternatively, FreeBSD coders could read the solution presented here in figure 5.

The 'Contributor of the Month' award goes to Mark Bergsma who has responded to our plea for help with the label compressor and contributed a wonderfully simple and right fix that allows PDNS to compress just as well as other nameservers out there. An honorary mention goes to Ueli Heuer who, despite having no C++ experience, submitted an excellent SRV record implementation.

Excellent work was also performed by Michel Stol, the Windows guy, in fixing all our non-portable stuff again. Christof Meerwald has also done wonderful work in porting MTasker to Windows, which was then used by Michel to get the recursor functioning on Windows.

Other changes

Version 2.9.4

Yet another grand release. Big news is the addition of a recursing nameserver which has sprung into existence over the past week. It is in use on several computers already but it is not ready for prime time. Complete integration with PowerDNS is expected around 2.9.5, for now the recursor is a separate program.

In preliminary tests, the recursor appears to be four times faster than BIND 9 on a naive benchmark starting from a cold cache. BIND 9 managed to get through to some slower nameservers however, which were given up on by PowerDNS. We will continue to tune the recursor. See Chapter 18, PowerDNS Recursor: a high performance resolving nameserver for further details.

The BIND Backend has also been tested (see the bind-domain-status item below) rather heavily by several parties. After some discussion online, one of the BIND authors ventured that the newsgroup comp.protocols.dns.bind may now in fact be an appropriate venue for discussing PowerDNS. Since this discussion, traffic to the PowerDNS pages has increased sixfold and shows no signs of slowing down.

From this, it is apparent that far more people are interested in PowerDNS than yet know about it. So spread the word!

In other news, we now have a security page at Section 4, “Security”. Furthermore, Maurice Nonnekes contributed an OpenBSD port! See his page for more details!

New features and improvements

A tremendous number of bugs were discovered and fixed

Version 2.9.3a

Note: 2.9.3a is identical to 2.9.3 except that zone2sql does work

Broad range of huge improvements. We now have an all-static .rpm and .deb for Linux users and a link to an OpenBSD port. Major news is that work on the Bind backend has progressed to the point that we've just retired our last Bind server and replaced it with PowerDNS in Bind mode! This server is operating a number of master and slave setups so it should stress the Bind backend somewhat.

This version is rapidly approaching the point where it is a better-Bind-than-Bind and nearly a drop-in replacement for authoritative setups. PowerDNS is now equipped with a powerful master/slave apparatus that offers a lot of insight and control to the user, even when operating from Bind zone files and a Bind configuration. Observe.

After the SOA of example.org was raised

pdns[17495]: All slave domains are fresh
pdns[17495]: 1 domain for which we are master needs notifications
pdns[17495]: Queued notification of domain 'example.org' to 195.193.163.3
pdns[17495]: Queued notification of domain 'example.org' to 213.156.2.1
pdns[17520]: AXFR of domain 'example.org' initiated by 195.193.163.3
pdns[17520]: AXFR of domain 'example.org' to 195.193.163.3 finished
pdns[17521]: AXFR of domain 'example.org' initiated by 213.156.2.1
pdns[17521]: AXFR of domain 'example.org' to 213.156.2.1 finished
pdns[17495]: Removed from notification list: 'example.org' to 195.193.163.3 (was acknowledged)
pdns[17495]: Removed from notification list: 'example.org' to 213.156.2.1 (was acknowledged)
pdns[17495]: No master domains need notifications

If however our slaves would ignore us, as some are prone to do, we can send some additional notifications

$ sudo pdns_control notify example.org
Added to queue
pdns[17492]: Notification request for domain 'example.org' received
pdns[17492]: Queued notification of domain 'example.org' to 195.193.163.3
pdns[17492]: Queued notification of domain 'example.org' to 213.156.2.1
pdns[17495]: Removed from notification list: 'example.org' to 195.193.163.3 (was acknowledged)
pdns[17495]: Removed from notification list: 'example.org' to 213.156.2.1 (was acknowledged)

Conversely, if PowerDNS needs to be reminded to retrieve a zone from a master, a command is provided

$ sudo pdns_control retrieve forfun.net
Added retrieval request for 'forfun.net' from master 212.187.98.67
pdns[17495]: AXFR started for 'forfun.net', transaction started
pdns[17495]: Zone 'forfun.net' (/var/cache/bind/forfun.net) reloaded
pdns[17495]: AXFR done for 'forfun.net', zone committed

Also, you can force PowerDNS to reload a zone from disk immediately with pdns_control bind-reload-now. All this happens 'live', per your instructions. Without instructions, the right things also happen, but the operator is in charge.

For more about all this coolness, see “pdns_control” and “pdns_control commands”.

Warning: Again some changes in compilation instructions. The hybrid pgmysql backend has been split up into 'gmysql' and 'gpgsql', sharing a common base within the PowerDNS server itself. This means that you can no longer compile --with-modules="pgmysql" --enable-mysql --enable-pgsql but that you should now use: --with-modules="gmysql gpgsql". The old launch-names remain available.

If you launch the Generic PgSQL backend as gpgsql2, all parameters will have gpgsql2 as a prefix, for example gpgsql2-dbname. If launched as gpgsql, the regular names are in effect.

Warning: The pdns_control protocol was changed which means that older pdns_controls cannot talk to 2.9.3. The other way around is broken too. This may lead to problems with automatic upgrade scripts, so pay attention if your daemon is truly restarted.

Also make sure no old pdns_control command is around to confuse things.

Improvements

Changes

Bugfixes

Version 2.9.2

Bugfixes galore. Solaris porting created some issues on all platforms. Great news is that PowerDNS is now in Debian 'sid' (unstable). The 2.9.1 packages in there currently aren't very good but the 2.9.2 ones will be. Many thanks to Wichert Akkerman, our 'downstream' for making this possible.

Warning: The Generic MySQL backend, part of the Generic MySQL & PostgreSQL backend, is now the DEFAULT! The previous default, the 'mysql' backend (note the lack of 'g') is now DEPRECATED. This was the source of much confusion. The 'mysql' backend does not support MASTER or SLAVE operation. The Generic backends do.

To get back the mysql backend, add --with-modules="mysql" or --with-dynmodules="mysql" if you prefer to load your modules at runtime.

Bugs fixed

Documentation

Features

Version 2.9.1

Thanks to the great enthusiasm from around the world, powerdns is now available for Solaris and FreeBSD users again! Furthermore, the Windows build is back. We are very grateful for the help of

We are happy to have been able to work with the open source community to improve PowerDNS!

Changes

Version 2.9

Open source release. Do not deploy unless you know what you are doing. Stability is expected to return with 2.9.1, as are the binary builds.

Version 2.8

From this release onwards, we'll concentrate on stabilising for the 3.0 release. So if you have any must-have features, let us know soonest. The 2.8 release fixes a bunch of small stability issues and add two new features. In the spirit of the move to stability, this release has already been running 24 hours on our servers before release.

Version 2.7 and 2.7.1

This version fixes some very long standing issues and adds a few new features. If you are still running 2.6, upgrade yesterday. If you were running 2.6.1, an upgrade is still strongly advised.

Features

Bugs

Version 2.6.1

Quick fix release for a big cache problem.

Version 2.6

Performance release. A lot of work has been done to raise PDNS performance to staggering levels in order to take part in benchmarketing efforts. Together with our as yet unnamed partner, PDNS has been benchmarked at 60.000 mostly cached queries/second on off the shelf PC hardware. Uncached performance was 17.000 uncached DNS queries/second on the .ORG domain.

Performance has been increased by both making PDNS itself quicker but also by lowering the number of backend queries typically needed. Operators will typically see PDNS taking less CPU and the backend seeing less load.

Furthermore, some real bugs were fixed. A couple of undocumented performance switches may appear in --help output but you are advised to stay away from these.

Developers: this version needs the pdns-2.5.1 development kit, available on http://downloads.powerdns.com/releases/dev. See also Backend writers' guide.

Performance

Bugs fixed

Features

Version 2.5.1

Brown paper bag release fixing a huge memory leak in the new Query Cache.

Developers: this version needs the new pdns-2.5.1 development kit, available on http://downloads.powerdns.com/releases/dev. See also Backend writers' guide.

And some small changes

Version 2.5

An important release which has seen quite a lot of trial and error testing. As a result, PDNS can now run with a huge cache and concurrent invalidations. This is useful when running of a slower database or under high traffic load with a fast database.

Furthermore, the gpgsql2 backend has been validated for use and will soon supplant the gpgsql backend entirely. This also bodes well for the gmysql backend which is the same code.

Also, a large amount of issues biting large scale slave operators were addressed. Most of these issues would only show up after prolonged uptime.

New features

Enhancements

Bugs fixed

Version 2.4

Developers: this version is compatible with the pdns-2.1 development kit, available on http://downloads.powerdns.com/releases/dev. See also Backend writers' guide.

This version fixes some stability issues with malformed or malcrafted packets. An upgrade is advised. Furthermore, there are interesting new features.

New features

Bugs fixed

Documentation: added details for strict-rfc-axfrs. This feature can be used if very old clients need to be able to do zone transfers with PDNS. Very slow.

Version 2.3

Developers: this version is compatible with the pdns-2.1 development kit, available on http://downloads.powerdns.com/releases/dev. See also Backend writers' guide

This release adds the Generic MySQL backend which allows full master/slave semantics with MySQL and InnoDB tables (or other tables that support transactions). See Generic MySQL and PgSQL backends.

Other new features

Bugs fixed

Version 2.2

Developers: this version is compatible with the pdns-2.1 development kit, available on http://downloads.powerdns.com/releases/dev. See also Backend writers' guide

Again a big release. PowerDNS is seeing some larger deployments in more demanding environments and these are helping shake out remaining issues, especially with recursing backends.

The big news is that wildcard CNAMEs are now supported, an oft requested feature and nearly the only part in which PDNS differed from BIND in authoritative capabilities.

If you were seeing signal 6 errors in PDNS causing reloads and intermittent service disruptions, please upgrade to this version.

For operators of PowerDNS Express trying to host .DE domains, the very special soa-serial-offset feature has been added to placate the new DENIC requirement that the SOA serial be at least six digits. PowerDNS Express uses the SOA serial as an actual serial and not to insert dates and hence often has single digit soa serial numbers, causing big problems with .DE redelegations.

Bugs fixed

New features

Version 2.1

This is a somewhat bigger release due to pressing demands from customers. An upgrade is advised for installations using Recursion. If you are using recursion, it is vital that you are aware of changes in semantics. Basically, local data will now override data in your recursing backend under most circumstances. Old behaviour can be restored by turning lazy-recursion off.

Developers: this version has a new pdns-2.1 development kit, available on http://downloads.powerdns.com/releases/dev. See also Appendix C, Backend writers' guide.

Warning: Most users will run a static version of PDNS which has no dependencies on external libraries. However, some may need to run the dynamic version. This warning applies to these users.

To run the dynamic version of PDNS, which is needed for backend drivers which are only available in source form, gcc 3.0 is required. RedHat 7.2 comes with gcc 3.0 as an optional component, RedHat 7.3 does not. However, the RedHat 7.2 Update gcc rpms install just fine on RedHat 7.3. For Debian, we suggest running 'woody' and installing the g++-3.0 package. We expect to release a FreeBSD dynamic version shortly.

Bugs fixed

Unexpected behaviour

Features

Version 2.0.1

Maintenance release, fixing three small issues.

Developers: this version is compatible with 1.99.11 backends.

Version 2.0

Two bugfixes, one stability/security related. No new features.

Developers: this version is compatible with 1.99.11 backends.

Bugfixes

Version 2.0 Release Candidate 2

Mostly bugfixes, no really new features.

Developers: this version is compatible with 1.99.11 backends.

Bugs fixed

Features

Remaining issues

Version 2.0 Release Candidate 1

The MacOS X release! A very experimental OS X 10.2 build has been added. Furthermore, the Windows version is now in line with Unix with respect to capabilities. The ODBC backend now has the code to function as both a master and a slave.

Developers: this version is compatible with 1.99.11 backends.

Bugs fixed

Windows changes. We are indebted to Dimitry Andric who educated us in the ways of distributing Windows software.

Version 1.99.12 Prerelease

The Windows release! See Installing on Microsoft Windows. Beware, windows support is still very fresh and untested. Feedback is very welcome.

Developers: this version is compatible with 1.99.11 backends.

Bugs fixed

Features

Version 1.99.11 Prerelease

This release is important because it is the first release which is accompanied by an Open Source Backend Development Kit, allowing external developers to write backends for PDNS. Furthermore, a few bugs have been fixed

Version 1.99.10 Prerelease

IMPORTANT: there has been a tiny license change involving free public webbased dns hosting, check out the changes before deploying!

PDNS is now feature complete, or very nearly so. Besides adding features, a lot of 'fleshing out' work is done now. There is an important performance bug fix which may have lead to disappointing benchmarks - so if you saw any of that, please try either this version or 1.99.8 which also does not have the bug.

This version has been very stable for us on multiple hosts, as was 1.99.9.

PostgreSQL users should be aware that while 1.99.10 works with the schema as presented in earlier versions, advanced features such as master or slave support will not work unless you create the new 'domains' table as well.

Bugs fixed

Features

Version 1.99.9 Early Access Prerelease

This is again a feature and an infrastructure release. We are nearly feature complete and will soon start work on the backends to make sure that they are all master, slave and 'superslave' capable.

Bugs fixed

Features

Internal

Version 1.99.8 Early Access Prerelease

A lot of infrastructure work gearing up to 2.0. Some stability bugs fixed and a lot of new features.

Bugs fixed

Feature enhancements

Known bugs

Missing features

Features present in this document, but disabled or withheld from the current release

Version 1.99.7 Early Access Prerelease

Named.conf parsing got a lot of work and many more bind configurations can now be parsed. Furthermore, error reporting was improved. Stability is looking good.

Bugs fixed

Feature enhancements

Known bugs

Wildcard CNAMEs do not work as they do with bind.

Missing features

Features present in this document, but disabled or withheld from the current release

Some of these features will be present in newer releases.

Version 1.99.6 Early Access Prerelease

This version is now running on dns-eu1.powerdns.net and working very well for us. But please remain cautious before deploying!

Bugs fixed

Feature enhancements

Known bugs

Missing features

Features present in this document, but disabled or withheld from the current release

Some of these features will be present in newer releases.

Version 1.99.5 Early Access Prerelease

The main focus of this release is stability and TCP improvements. This is the first release PowerDNS-the-company actually considers for running on its production servers!

Major bugs fixed

Feature enhancements

Performance enhancements

Known bugs

Missing features

Features present in this document, but disabled or withheld from the current release

Some of these features will be present in newer releases.

Version 1.99.4 Early Access Prerelease

A lot of new named.confs can now be parsed, zone2sql & bindbackend have gained features and stability.

Major bugs fixed

Feature enhancements

Performance enhancements

Known bugs

Missing features

Features present in this document, but disabled or withheld from the current release

Some of these features will be present in newer releases.

Version 1.99.3 Early Access Prerelease

The big news in this release is the BindBackend which is now capable of parsing many more named.conf Bind configurations. Furthermore, PDNS has successfully parsed very large named.confs with large numbers of small domains, as well as small numbers of large domains (TLD).

Zone transfers are now also much improved.

Major bugs fixed

Feature enhancements

Performance enhancements

Known bugs

Missing features

Features present in this document, but disabled or withheld from the current release

Some of these features will be present in newer releases.

Version 1.99.2 Early Access Prerelease

Major bugs fixed

Performance improvements

Having said that, more work may need to be done. Testing on a 486 saw packet rates in a simple setup (question/wait/answer/question..) improve from 200 queries/second to over 400.

Usability improvements

Stability may be an issue as well as performance. This version has a tendency to log a bit too much which slows the nameserver down a lot.

Known bugs

name         IN            A        192.0.2.4
             IN            A        192.0.2.5

To fix, add 'name' to the second line.

Zone2sql does not close file descriptors.

FreeBSD version does not stop when requested via the init.d script.

Missing features

Features present in this document, but disabled or withheld from the current release

Some of these features will be present in newer releases.

Version 1.99.1 Early Access Prerelease

This is the first public release of what is going to become PDNS 2.0. As such, it is not of production quality. Even PowerDNS-the-company does not run this yet.

Stability may be an issue as well as performance. This version has a tendency to log a bit too much which slows the nameserver down a lot.

Known bugs

Decreasing a ringbuffer on the website is a sure way to crash the daemon. Zone2sql is very buggy.

Missing features

Features present in this document, but disabled or withheld from the current release:

Some of these features will be present in newer releases.